Monday, May 30, 2011

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane
Honda Hurricane
Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane

Honda Hurricane
Honda Hurricane
Honda Hurricane

A Swedish Guest

Last week I received a new bicycle for an extended test ride and review: a Pilen Lyx. The distributor (BoxCycles) gave me a choice of colours and I took a gamble once again instead of just asking for black. This time the gamble paid off: The unusual shade of blue looks as stunning in person as it did in pictures. It is an ethereal "northern skies after an afternoon storm" sort of blue that I just want to keep staring at.

A small Swedish manufacturer, Pilen has been producing bicycles since 1998. The worksmanship looks outstanding.

The finishing on the TIG-welded frame with lugged fork crown, seat collar, and capped seat stays is up there with the quality of high-end custom frames.

I will cover the frame details in the review after I've had more time with the bike, but so far I am pleasantly surprised.

Nice headbadge, too. Pilen means "arrow" in Swedish.

The lady's frame is available in one size only and it is huge: 56cm or 58cm (22"+), depending on how you measure it. At 5'7" I had to slam the saddle down, but I'm used to that: my Gazelle and Raleigh DL-1 are the same size.

Here are the Gazelle and the Pilen together. The Pilen will be kept outdoors for the duration of its visit, which will allow me to test its resistance to the elements. The distributor assumed this as a matter of course, since that is how he keeps his own bike and that is how Pilens were designed to be stored.

I've been riding the bike since Friday, but am not ready to describe the ride quality yet. It is not like a Dutch bike, and neither is it like an English roadster, so I am trying to "understand" it. I am also still messing with the handlebar and saddle positions and will hold off on my impressions until I get those just right.

But wait, there's more...

In their generosity, the distributor has given me the green light to give this bicycle away once I am finished reviewing it. There are no strings attached: I can just give it to one of my readers in any way I see fit. This is exciting, and I already have an idea for a contest that is kind of kooky, but hopefully fun. So if you are a taller lady, the Pilen could be yours! The final review will probably be ready in 3 weeks' time, and that is also when the bicycle will be given away. Stay tuned and I will post more about the contest next week!

mercedes maybach exelero fast cars

mercedes maybach
German luxury car manufacturer Maybach. It was presented in May 2005 in Berlin Germany. The 700 hp (522 kW) two-seater with a bi-turbo V12 engine is a one-off design commissioned by Fulda Tyres.Fulda is using this car as a reference vehicle to test a new generation of wide tyres. The German luxury car manufacturer created the one-off model as a modern interpretation of its legendary streamlined sportscar from the 1930s. There are various allusions to the historical predecessor, which was likewise based on a powerful Maybach automobile.

mercedes maybach

mercedes maybach

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Right of Way and Driver Education

Last night we were returning home on our bikes. As we approached an intersection where we needed to make a left turn, we signaled and moved to the leftmost part of the lane. A motorist approaching the same intersection behind us began to honk. We turned around, confused. The light had just turned red and all three of us were stopped at the intersection. She continued to honk. We asked what the problem was. She rolled down her window, and the conversation went something like this:

Motorist:  What the hell are you doing?!
We:  What do you mean?
Motorist: You're not supposed to be in front of me like that, you're blocking the road!
We: We're using the road just like you. Why are you honking?
Motorist: What the hell am I supposed to do when you're blocking my way?!
We: You're supposed to wait for us to turn.
Motorist: But you're not supposed to be there if I need to get by. You don't have the right of way!
We: What? Of course we have the right of way, we were here first.
Motorist: Unless you're in the bike lane, you do not have the right of way! You're supposed to let me get by!
We: Bicycles have the right of way just like any other vehicle.
Motorist: Not if you're not in the bike lane!
We: Yes. Check your facts.
Motorist: No! You check your facts!

I don't know how things would have gone had the light not turned green at that point, but it did. The motorist floored the gas pedal and veered around us in order to proceed straight as we made our left turn.

It's not so much the motorist's rudeness that I found alarming  (she was screaming at us), but the fact that she genuinely believed that cyclists did not have the right of way unless they were in the bike lane. In other words, she thought that if a cyclist needed to make a left turn, they must stand aside and wait for all the cars behind them to pass before they were allowed to proceed. This is blatantly incorrect, but that doesn't help any in situations like this.

In my view, lack of drivers' awareness about bicycling laws is largely responsible for cyclist-motorist confrontations. When I first began riding a bike in Boston, drivers would occasionally scold me for "breaking the law" (i.e. cycling on the road). Now that bicycles have become more common this seldom happens, but yesterday's encounter shows that misunderstanding of road rules still exists. I've read that in areas where this is especially bad, cyclists have taken to carrying copies of local bicycle laws and handing them out to motorists who harass them. That is further than I personally would want to go. But it seems to me that some driver's ed initiative is in order - especially if a city is actively striving to be more "bicycle friendly."

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Cycling and Sun Damage

Though I have derived many benefits from cycling, the one drawback I am still struggling with is sun damage. During my first year on the bike as an adult, I thought that I was being pretty good about using sun protection, but noticed visible damage to my skin that seemed to be a direct result of cycling over the summer months. Darkened patches and wrinkles appeared in areas of my face and body that had been most exposed to the sun while cycling. And this was despite using high SPF sunblock and staying off the road during the hottest times of the day.

At some point last summer, I switched from chemical to physical sunblock (titanium dioxide or zinc oxide), which seems to have helped. My skin was sensitive to the chemical stuff, and some friends told me that 30SPF physical block worked better for them than 60+SPF chemical, as well as lasted considerably longer. I switched and found this to be true for me as well. Physical sunblock remains visible after application and looks kind of goofy, but at this point I couldn't care less and just want to ride my bike without wrecking my skin. After year two there was still some additional skin damage, but less than before.This summer I will try to be extra good about applying the sunblock as frequently as possible.

In speaking to long-time road cyclists about sun damage, I've learned that it is a common complaint - to the extent that some just accept it as inevitable, embrace their wrinkles and brown spots, and pay frequent visits to the dermatologist. I really don't want to believe that it has to be that way, but my own case has done nothing to prove them wrong. What has been your experience with sun damage as a result of cycling, and how do you deal with it?

Friday, May 27, 2011

Suzuki LS650 Savage

Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Suzuki LS650 Savage
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Best Cars Wallpaper Sites

1st used cars
1st cars news
all bikes wallpapers
let car
One Cars wallpapers
Cars wallpaper gallery
car becho
bikes gallery
automotive cars bikes
audi cars news
hq wallpapers gallery
jai cars
First Bmw cars wallpapers
Ford cars wallpapers
car top speed
car dekh